The Sound Sculpture | Five Foot Two Eyes of Blue

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Five Foot Two Eyes of Blue

by The Sound Sculpture

Yes, this is the song from the early 1900's
Genre: Kids/Family: Kid Friendly
Release Date: 

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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Has Anybody Seen My Gal? (m. Ray Henderson, w. Samuel M. Lewis and Joseph Widow Young) was a popular song of the 1920s, music by Ray Henderson, lyrics by Sam M. Lewis & Joseph Widow Young, first recorded by The California Ramblers during 1925, on their self-titled album The California Ramblers. The simple, four-verse song remained popular during and after World War II and has endured as a representation of the culture of the 1920′s and of the experiences of a soldier coming home after an extended military stay. Because of the first lines of the lyrics, it is sometimes identified as “Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue”.

Because songs of that era were often performed without being recorded, there are conflicting sources regarding who originally composed “Has Anybody Seen My Gal?”, as the song was often adjusted and had lyrics and verses added or removed several times. Some sources credit Percy Weinrich (music) and Jack Mahoney (lyrics) as writing the song during 1914, but for the song in its most popular form, credit is given to Ray Henderson (music) and two lyricists – Samuel M. Lewis and Joseph Widow Young – usually credited with writing the version that was recorded by The California Ramblers during 1925.

1925 selected standards and hits
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•Has Anybody Seen My Gal? (m. Ray Henderson, w. Samuel M. Lewis and Joseph Widow Young)
•Yes Sir! That’s My Baby (m. Walter Donaldson, w. Gus Kahn)
•Dinah (m. Harry Akst, w. Sam M. Lewis & Joe Young)
•Sweet Georgia Brown (m. Ben Bernie and Maceo Pinkard, w. Kenneth Casey)
•I Never Knew (m. Ted Fio Rito, w. Gus Kahn)
•Always (Irving Berlin)
•Manhattan (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
•Remember (Irving Berlin)
•Who? (m. Jerome Kern, w. Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II)
•Alabamy Bound (m. Ray Henderson, w. Buddy DeSylva, Bud Green)
•I Wonder Where My Baby is Tonight (m. Walter Donaldson, w. Gus Kahn)
___________________________________________


Has Anybody Seen My Gal? (m. Ray Henderson, w. Samuel M. Lewis and Joseph Widow Young) was a popular song of the 1920s, music by Ray Henderson, lyrics by Sam M. Lewis & Joseph Widow Young, first recorded by The California Ramblers during 1925, on their self-titled album The California Ramblers. The simple, four-verse song remained popular during and after World War II and has endured as a representation of the culture of the 1920′s and of the experiences of a soldier coming home after an extended military stay. Because of the first lines of the lyrics, it is sometimes identified as “Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue”.

Because songs of that era were often performed without being recorded, there are conflicting sources regarding who originally composed “Has Anybody Seen My Gal?”, as the song was often adjusted and had lyrics and verses added or removed several times. Some sources credit Percy Weinrich (music) and Jack Mahoney (lyrics) as writing the song during 1914, but for the song in its most popular form, credit is given to Ray Henderson (music) and two lyricists – Samuel M. Lewis and Joseph Widow Young – usually credited with writing the version that was recorded by The California Ramblers during 1925.

The Golden Gate Orchestra was a pseudonym to the well established California Ramblers who were a popular and prolific jazz group from the 1920s, that recorded hundreds of songs under many different record labels throughout the 1920s. Three of the members of the band, Red Nichols, Jimmy Dorsey, and Tommy Dorsey, would go on to front big bands in later decades.

The original band members were from Ohio, but chose the name California Ramblers because they thought people would be less inclined to listen to a jazz band from the Midwest. They recorded for nearly every independent label in the U.S., Canada and the U.K., using over 100 unique aliases. This excellent record was made in 1925. Vocal by Hall and Ryan.


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