Deborah Thurlow | I am

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Classical: New Music Ensemble Avant Garde: Modern Composition Moods: Type: Improvisational
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I am

by Deborah Thurlow

An electronic eclectic experience not to be missed with Eric Ross, Clive Smith and me on french horn, shofar, tingha and Tibetan singing bowl.
Genre: Classical: New Music Ensemble
Release Date: 

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1. Ancient Future for horn, electric guitar & devices - Clive Smith Deborah Thurlow, Clive Smith, Eric Ross
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12:46 $0.99
2. Serenade (Op.46) for horn, theremin, piano & devices - Eric Ross Deborah Thurlow, Clive Smith, Eric Ross
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10:26 $0.99
3. Movement 2 Deborah Thurlow, Clive Smith, Eric Ross
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10:17 $0.99
4. Sacred Postlude (Archangel Sandalphon) for horn, shofar, Tibetan Deborah Thurlow
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4:26 $0.99
5. Prolonged Shofar Variations - for horn solo - Yaacov Mishori Deborah Thurlow
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4:33 $0.99
6. The Chaotic World - for horn, electric guitar, theremin, strings Deborah Thurlow, Clive Smith, Eric Ross
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18:29 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Program Notes

For Ancient Future I imagined a realm where, beneath their apparent surface differences, the horn and the electronics could exploit some of their shared qualities. The techniques I used for creating the real-time electronic ambience, which included distortion, feedback, flanging, chorusing, phasing, resonant delays, echoes, loops etc., kept reinforcing the oldest and most elemental building material of music - the overtone series. The horn's relationship with the harmonic series has, of course, always been a close one. The use of mostly simple, modal themes prevents the piece from straying too far from this overtone territory.
© Copyright 1999 by Clive Smith, ASCAP

Serenade (Op.46). The instruments form a dialogue around fixed sections, comprising tonal, atonal, and serial materials; and improvisational sections, where the players are asked to imitate human, animal, instrumental sounds and each other. The second movement adds a vocal text, parts of which are written in Esperanto, one of the first universal languages. The horn is electronically processed to extend its range and timbre. The theremin, one of the earliest electronic instruments, is ideally suited to carry music into the future. It's a human instrument, extremely sensitive to touch and control.
© Copyright 1995 by Eric Ross Ty'ava Music, BMI

Sacred Postlude - Archangel Sandalphon is the only horn piece from Deborah's debut New Age CD, Angelic Waves. The melodic theme, Avinu Malkeinu, played by the horn is a well known Hebrew prayer sung during the Jewish New Year. The quarter tones played on the horn provide a cohesive blend with the natural harmonics of shofar, Tibetan singing bowl and tingsha.
© Copyright 2000 by Deborah Thurlow, ASCAP

Prolonged Shofar Variations -Yaacov Mishori plays first horn in the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. He is a member of the Israel Brass Quintet, teaches at the Rubin Academy of Music at Tel Aviv University, and a journalist in the fields of arts and social sciences for various newspapers. Mishori also writes and hosts a weekly program, "Classical is Fun," on the army radio station.

The Prolonged Shofar Variations is based on quotations from Jewish prayers and biblical cantillation. The work is dedicated to the composer's father, a famous cantor and teacher of biblical cantillation, on the occasion of his eightieth birthday.
© Copyright 1981 by Israel Brass Woodwind Publications, ACUM
www.ortav.com

The Chaotic World explores three types of improvisations: Jazz, Aleatoric, and Free Contemporary. It opens with a Free improvisation of electric guitar textures, which segues into a fugal section played by the solo horn and strings. The fugal section transforms into a jazz style, with the strings swinging the eighths while the horn continues to play its line straight creating a duality. Then there is an abrupt grand pause followed by a two bar string vamp leading into a Jazz and Aleatoric improvisation by the horn and electric guitar. After the improvisation, the horn returns to playing in a straight manner with swinging strings. The fugal section repeats, suddenly interrupted with the horn's statement of the Gregorian chant, Dies Irae, Dies Illae (Day of Wrath, Oh Dreadful Day). You hear the additional sounds of the theremin, gong and Free Contemporary improvisation interrupted three times by the strings playing a twelve-tone passage. The piece ends with a short, three-part canon with the echo of chimes in the background.
© Copyright 2001 by Deborah Thurlow, ASCAP

Sound Healing Association

REVIEW CLIPS

The Horn Call – John Dressler – Volume XXXVI, No. 1, October 2005 - PATCHWORKS
…performers may find great value in the literature on this particular disc.

All About Jazz – Budd Kopman – October 2, 2005 - PATCHWORKS
Thurlow is clearly a master of this area of musical composition and performance, attracting talented composers and performers into the orbit of Turn on the Music.

Computer Music Journal – Sandy Nordahl – Volume 27 – Issue 3 – Fall 2003 – I Am
Overall, this disc is an impressive endeavor. Ms. Thurlow really knows how to create a mood that hangs thick, like a fog clinging to the ground on a cold, full-moon night."

iTunes Music Blog – Hank Shiffman – December 31, 2004 – I Am
…this album is a noble effort. Ms. Thurlow and her collaborators combine instruments that have probably never been heard together before.

I am hangs together and creates a mood and a sense of place and purpose…feels like a soundtrack to a fantasy film…not a low budget shlocky film. I’d love to see the movie that merits these sounds behind it.

Metaphysical Reviews – Richard Fuller - April 2002 – Angelic Waves – Part 1
Composer and musician Deborah Thurlow now gives us an album that can lift the spirit of the listener while at the same time, offer the perfect means to meditation. And if that's not enough, Deborah Thurlow gave this reviewer a magic carpet that transported me to a better place, all within my heart.

Electronic Music Foundation – Joel Chadabe - December 2001 – I Am
"...chooses the music that she plays to allow her to create striking timbres that range from the reflective to the dramatic, from the romantic to the brash; and as she puts it all together, she emerges with an original and strong voice as instrumentalist and as composer...Thurlow plays horn, shofar, Tibetan singing bowl, and tingsha; Eric Ross plays theremin and piano; Clive Smith electric guitar with devices ... In short, the very choice of instruments is surprising, and she uses them in various combinations to great effect."

The Horn Magazine – Ian Wagstaff - December 2001 – I Am
"Forget Rattigan and Shilkloper, this jazz horn CD, entitled ‘I Am’, is really different. Quite how different? Well, combine the Dalai Lama with Berlioz, throw in some Hebraic influence and you might be getting there. New Jersey horn player, Deborah Thurlow uses an eclectic mix of instruments...strong electronic influence." IAN WAGSTAFF

The Horn Call – John Dressler - November 2001 – I Am
"Most of the music on this latest recording is atmospheric, metrically free, and soul-searching. Sections are reminiscent of music of Harry Partch, Rick Todd, and Tom Varner; other sections are pensive, subtle, and reverberant."

Redludwig.com – George Follett - October 4, 2001 – I Am
"At times, I Am, is also a study in contrasting derivations, sounding like a curious amalgam of early Stockhausen, the tone poetry of Diamanda Galas and the soundtrack to a '50s sci-fi movie."
"The most satisfying track, Thurlow's The Chaotic World, mixes quasi-melodic string passages with the whirring theremin and clanging, pseudo-metal guitar riffs from Clive Smith. The contrasts of styles, tones and sensibilities is mesmerizing."

New York Times - Allan Kozinn - June 15, 1991 -
"The program also included Deborah Sandoval-Thurlow's `Lunch at Moishe's Delicatessen,' an amusing inventively colorful score."


Biography

Deborah Thurlow - CUNY BA, Kingsborough CC/Lehman College, MFA, SUNY Purchase - a resident of Teaneck, New Jersey is a freelance musician in the tri-state area and Europe. In 1999 she produced a two day music event, Next Horn Wave, where she got together
horn players from the East/West Coasts and Europe to perform music devoted to the art of both Contemporary and Jazz Improvisation. She is presently on faculty at Newark School of the Arts. In 1995 she performed in, That New Group concert of new works in the spirit of Dada and Futurism. Directed and produced by Joanne Mafia. She performed with Eric Ross in a work written especially for her by Mr. Ross, for horn, theremin and piano called, Serenade, at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church in Manhattan. On the same program she performed in her one act play, Horn Ritual, where she not only plays the horn and shofar using electronic sound effects she streches herself by acting. She has also performed with Pina Baush Ballet Company, Franz Kaman, David Amram, Anthony Davis, The New York Composers Orchestra, Clive Smith and many others too numerous to mention. She is on occasion an editorial contributor to, The New Music Connoisseur, a magazine devoted to the contemporary music scene.

She studied composition and orchestration with John Corigliano at Lehman College. Her works are published with Ensemble Publications/Nichols Music Company and DSM Producers. She has received grants from Meet the Composer, William Petshek Music Fund, The Puffin Foundation and also Composer in Residence at Morehead State University in Kentucky in the summer of 1988 and has been reviewed favorably in the New York Times and other printed media. Her one act play with music The Creative Void Of The Planet Earth, had an Equity Showcase of seven performances in April of 1997 by the New Media Repertory under the direction of Miranda MacDermot. She has five recordings to her credit, Angelic Waves - Part 1 (2000), Angelic Waves - Part 2 (2003 and It’s Not The Way – CD Single (2007) are independent releases and I Am (2001), Patchworks (2004) on the Capstone Records label. In 2008 she will release her recording, The Darwin Effect, with Capstone Records.

Equipment
DOD GS30 - Digital Multi-Effect Guitar System
Shure Wireless Microphone System - L Series
Peavey Bass Amplifier

userweb.cybernex.net/~sandee

Eric Ross is an American composer working in an avant-garde idiom. He received his BA and MA from SUNY. He's performed concerts of his original works at Lincoln Center, Newport Jazz Festival, Berlin, Montreux, North Sea Jazz Festivals, Copenhagen New Music Festival and Gilmore International Keyboard Festival among many others worldwide.

For over twenty years he's led his own ensemble which has featured jazz giants John Abercrombie, Larry Coryell, Andrew Cyrille, Oliver Lake, Leroy Jenkins, and new music virtuosos including Youseff Yancy, Lydia Kavina and Robert Dick. He's also performed with blues legends Champion Jack Dupree, Lonnie Brooks, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee.

With his wife, Mary Ross, video and computer artist, he is presented multi - media concerts with music, film, video and computer art. He is written several works for symphonies, chamber ensembles and solo instruments. Since 1975 he's written and performed on the theremin. He is appeared on radio and TV, written an overture for 14 theremins playing simultaneously, and gave the world premiere of Percy Grainger's Free Music No.1 in New York City. He was personal friends with Clara Rockmore and met and played for Professor Lev Termen in 1991. He's drawn inspiration from them to continue developing the theremin as a voice in his own compositions. The NY Times calls his work, "a unique blend of classical, jazz, serial and avant-garde."

Equipment
Customized Moog Etherwave Model Theremin
MXR Digital Delay
Eventide Harmonizer
Italien Custom Wah-wah pedal

www.geocities.com/theremin_eross/

Clive A. H. Smith (born, London, England) is a composer/performer, ASCAP member, guitarist, vocalist, synthesist and sound designer. He holds an MA in composition from New York University. His most recent CD releases are his first solo album of songs, Clever Animals, and The Gallery Soundscapes, Vol.1, a collection of ambient instrumental music he co-wrote with Bob Kaus and which he and Bob performed under the name In Real Time.

Film credits include co-writing the music to the underground cult film Liquid Sky. At present he continues to write instrumental background and theme music for TV and film. His music has been used on U.S. television by ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, PBS, local stations and cable and oversees in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

Equipment
Customized 1966 Gretsch Viking electric guitar
Ebow, electronic bowing device
Line 6 POD amp modeler
Line 6 delay modeler, delay and looping device
Akai Headrush, delay and looping device
Modified Roland Chorus/Echo RE-301, tape delay and vari-speed looping device
Roland GP-8 effects unit w/pedal board controller (distortion, chorusing,
flanging, phasing, EQ etc.)
Yamaha DMP11 mixer and digital effects unit
Electro-Harmonix ring modulator
ART Dual MP, tube mic preamp
Fender 1960s Princeton tube amp

www.clivesmith.com

PLAYING TIME - 61:00 OR 1:1:00


Reviews


to write a review

Sandy Nordahl, Computer Music Journal, Volume 27, Issue 3, Fall


Overall, this disc is an impressive
endeavor. Ms. Thurlow really knows
how to create a mood that hangs
thick, like a fog clinging to the
ground on a cold, full-moon night.

George Follett


Composer and horn player Deborah Thurlow's musical palette is awash in contrasts. It is, by turns, delicate and mystical, then brash and clangorous. Moments of stark, electronic pointillism compete with and complement others that are expansive
and symphonic.
At times, I Am is also a study in contrasting derivations, sounding like a curious amalgam of early Stockhausen, the tone poetry of Diamanda Galas and the soundtrack to a '50s sci-fi movie. The latter reference comes from Thurlow's use of that
quintessential electronic standby, the theremin (played here to virtuoso effect by Eric Ross). On pieces such as Ross' Serenade [Op. 46], the CD offers dense aural landscapes of droning textures populated by expressive flourishes from Thurlow's
electronically-treated horn. The most satisfying track, Thurlow's The Chaotic World, mixes quasi-melodic string passages with the whirring theremin and clanging, pseudo-metal guitar riffs from Clive Smith. The contrasts of styles, tones and sensibilities is mesmerizing.

The Horn Call, 11/1/01, John Dressler


"Deborah Thurlow is a freelance musician in the PA-NJ-NY
area. She specializes in music devoted to the art of
contemporary and jazz improvisation. On the faculty at the
Newark Community School of the Arts, she is currently working
on New Horn on the Block, a live documentary of the horn in
jazz. In 2000, she released her first New Age CD titled Angelic
Waves. Most of the music on this latest recording is
atmospheric, metrically free, and soul-searching. Sections are
reminiscent of music of Harry Partch, Rick Todd, and Tom
Varner; other sections are pensive, subtle, and reverberant. The
full gamut of open, stopped, bent notes and the like are
combined with the colorful instruments lend a truly unique setting
for concerts and recitals. At times, the hornist is connected to a
wireless mike and guitar pedals; Track 4 features a tape loop of
a Tibetan Singing Bowl. From unaccompanied horn to the
medium of horn, electric guitar, theremin, strings, and percussion,
the music has something for everyone. Ancient Future includes
distortion, feedback, flanging, chorusing, phasing, resonant
delays, echoes, and loops to keep reinforcing the oldest and
most elemental building block of music: the overtone series. In
Serenade, the instruments form a dialogue around fixed sections
comprising tonal, atonal and serial materials. The players are
asked to imitate human, animal, and instrumental sounds to each
other. The opening melodic theme in Sacred Postlude, played by
the horn, is a well-known Hebrew prayer sung during Jewish
New Year. The quarter-tones provide a cohesive blend with the
natural harmonics of shofar, Tibetan Singing Bowl, and tingsha.
Prolonged Shofar Variations is based on quotations from Jewish
prayers and biblical chant. The Chaotic World explores three
types of improvisation: jazz, aleatoric, and free contemporary. A
repeated fugal section is suddenly interrupted by the Dies Irae
chant from the Requiem mass. The piece ends with a short
three-part canon with the echo of chimes in the background."

Horn Magazine, December 2001,Ian Wagstaff


Horn Magazine - December 2001 - by Ian Wagstaff

Forget Rattigan and Shilkloper, this jazz horn CD, entitled 'I
Am', is really different. Quite how different? Well, combine the
Dalai Lama with Berlioz, throw in some Hebraic influence and
you might be getting there. New Jersey horn player, Deborah
Thurlow uses an eclectic mix of instruments, from the shofar to
the Tibetan singing bowl, to accompany her playing, although on
most tracks there is a strong electronic influence.

On just one, 'Prolonged Shofar Variations' by Israel
Philharmonic principal Yaacov Mishori, is the horn out on its
own, albeit with a fair amount of hand stopping to provide a
contrast in sound. This, and Thurlow's own 'Sacred Postlude',
are both the shortest pieces and the nearest the CD gets to
conventional horn playing. Thurlow also puts her mark on the
second of her own compositions, 'The Chaotic World' in which
she stamps out the Dies Irae, Dies Illae over everything from a
string orchestra to one of the earliest electronic instruments, a
theremin.

Clive Smith's 'Ancient Future' for horn, electronic guitar and
devices has an intriguing, atmospheric quality, but, in the longest
piece on the CD, Eric Ross's 'Serenade' for horn, theremin,
piano and devices, we are arguably taken a bridge too far. The
imitations and the improvisations of the first movement are
followed by an Esperanto vocal text in the second and a horn,
which is electronically processed and extended in scope.

Electronic Music Foundation, January 2002, Joel Chadabe


Deborah Thurlow, horn player, plays a variety of compositions. And Deborah Thurlow, composer, chooses the music that she plays to allow her to create striking timbres that range from the reflective to the dramatic, from the romantic to the brash; and as she puts it all together, she emerges with an original and strong voice as instrumentalist and as composer. She is joined in this CD by other musicians. Thurlow plays horn, shofar, Tibetan singing bowl, and tingsha; Eric Ross plays theremin and piano; Clive Smith electric guitar with devices ... In short, the very choice of instruments is surprising, and she uses them in various combinations to great effect.