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by TL0741

Structured improvisations for manipulated sounds and analogue modular synthesizer.
Genre: Electronic: Experimental
Release Date: 

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1. Orchrustra
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14:39 $1.49
2. Back to Minus
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13:54 $1.49
3. Mirror Faces Mirror
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10:37 $1.49
4. Simmervolts
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5:55 $1.49
5. Morphantasia
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4:44 $1.49
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
TL0741’s debut release features three immersive, “long-form” performances and two shorter ones, recorded January 2005 – March 2007 in and around Washington, DC. Some excerpted reactions from the blogosphere:

“Congruent to his Northern Machine project, TL0741 is a solo effort that probes the territory of evil retro sci-fi without one ounce of camp. Every filter sweep to bassy drone rumble, projects the listener into ever deeper foreboding sonic atmospheres.
If you liked Zoviet France and Throbbing Gristle back in the day I think you will really enjoy this. Gillis has exacting standards when it comes to modulating those VCO's but if you prefer your noise with a bit of glitch and buffer-override, perhaps you may need a bit more sound mangle in your ear.”
Derek Morton, furthernoise (dot) org

“No telling what the band's name means (if anything), but the sound is a tad more classifiable -- experimental electronica, heavy on the drone theology and peppered with cryptic machine noises, repetitive noise rhythms, and laced with sheets of ambient sound that's equal parts noise and drone. There's a deeply mysterious feel to a lot of the material, but especially the title track, with its whirlygig noises and fractured electronic chattering. Of the five pieces here, three of them are relatively long (between ten and fifteen minutes each), extended sonic landscapes with plenty of room for the exploration of different sounds and structures that evolve like the shifting of tectonic plates. A fine collection of drone / noise soundscapes, packaged in an oversized plastic digipak with suitably cryptic artwork.”
RKF, theonetruedeadangel (dot) blogspot (dot) com

“In lieu of melodic structure, this miasma is periodically boosted in volume to give the piece a variation in its nasty flow. Bubbling noises rise amid this mechanical cacophony, lending a hint of respite from the dire circumstances, followed by traces of mellow harmonics--which are swiftly beaten down by a resurgence of industrial noise. No rhythmics are employed.
Subsequent tracks pursue similar motifs in temperament and dissonance. Grinding gears and whirling rotary blades contribute further agitation. Often, the mix becomes so crowded with animosity that the tuneage edges on inducing pain on the listener. If not pain, then at least an overwhelming sense of uneasiness.
These compositions are designed to disturb the psyche, plunging the audience into a realm of machine dominance. No trace of organic character is discernible.”
Matt Howarth, www (dot) soniccuriosity (dot) com


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