Townes van Zandt | Songs Torn From the Flesh (Dutch import)

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Bob Dylan Guy Clark Mickey Newbury

More Artists From
United States - United States

Other Genres You Will Love
Folk: Folk Blues Country: Country Folk Moods: Mood: Brooding
There are no items in your wishlist.

Songs Torn From the Flesh (Dutch import)

by Townes van Zandt

Both of Texas singer-songwriter Townes Van Zandt's wonderful early 70s albums, "High, Low and In Between" and "The Late, Great Townes Van Zandt" that make up this CD reissue were ventures that attempted to produce quality first, hits second. The ownership of the albums has been subject of a long legal dispute between Kevin Eggers’ Topmato Records and EMI Music, owner of the United records imprint that originally paid for the recordings and released these albums. Some of the songs of “Songs Torn From The Flesh” are alternative takes and mixes.
Genre: Folk: Folk Blues
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Buy 2 or more of this title and get 10% off
Share to Google +1

Tracks

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Two Hands
Share this song!
X
2:30 album only
2. You Are Not Needed Now
Share this song!
X
4:12 album only
3. Greensboro Woman
Share this song!
X
2:18 album only
4. Highway Kind
Share this song!
X
2:14 album only
5. Standin'
Share this song!
X
3:21 album only
6. No Deal
Share this song!
X
3:12 album only
7. To Live Is To Fly
Share this song!
X
3:15 album only
8. When He Offers His Hand
Share this song!
X
2:59 album only
9. Mr. Gold And Mr. Mud
Share this song!
X
2:21 album only
10. Blue Ridge Mountains
Share this song!
X
2:10 album only
11. High, Low And In Between
Share this song!
X
3:12 album only
12. No Lonesome Tune
Share this song!
X
4:20 album only
13. Sad Cinderella
Share this song!
X
4:15 album only
14. German Mustard
Share this song!
X
2:55 album only
15. Don't Let The Sunshine Fool Ya
Share this song!
X
2:25 album only
16. Honky Tonkin'
Share this song!
X
3:43 album only
17. Snow don't Fall
Share this song!
X
2:26 album only
18. Fraulein
Share this song!
X
2:42 album only
19. Pancho & Lefty
Share this song!
X
3:37 album only
20. If I Needed You
Share this song!
X
3:42 album only
21. Silver Ships Of Andilar
Share this song!
X
5:04 album only
22. Heavenly Houseboat Blues
Share this song!
X
2:50 album only
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Both of Texas singer-songwriter Townes Van Zandt's wonderful early 70s albums, "High, Low and In Between" and "The Late, Great Townes Van Zandt" that make up this CD reissue were recorded for Kevin Eggers, whose Poppy and Tomato labels, both subsumed at the time under United Artists, were ventures that attempted to produce quality first, hits second. Unfortunately, the label's regularly dire financial straits hampered Townes Van Zandt's rare forays into the music business. Rather, they fed his desire for solitude and distance. Having migrated to Tennessee where he lived in a cabin, re-emerging only rarely to perform and record, the Townes Van Zandt mystique lived on, with the veil over his history pierced only lightly by the clues in his songs.

Its musical variety made "High, Low And In Between" a more interesting listen than Van Zandt's previous four albums, but what made it his best album since his debut was the quality of the songs, especially "You Are Not Needed Now" and "To Live Is To Fly."

On his sixth album in five years, "The Late Great Townes Van Zandt" seemed to be less prolific, but his song writing craft only improved. He recorded three cover tunes, including one by his heralded main influence Hank Williams. Among the originals were "Pancho and Lefty", a downplayed eulogy for a pair of undistinguished drifters that outlines their story squarely, without romance or sentiment, rather catching the despair and pointlessness of their lives without turning mawkish. "If I Needed You" is about a lover's questioning and is one of his most telling romantic statements.

There seems to be a consensus about Townes being a derelict, a rambler and a rowdy, and more or less the greatest living songwriter in America. But in Austin, Texas - the gathering ground for a tribe of singer-songwriters who have driven the engine of a folk-country movement that has helped advance the careers of such diverse and quirky artists as Lyle Lovett, Nance Griffith and Butch Hancock - Townes Van Zandt's song writing is spoken of with the hushed reverence reserved for icons. Steve Earle has famously said he would "stand on Bob Dylan's coffee table in my cowboy boots" to tell him that Townes van Zandt is the best songwriter in the whole world. Van Zandt has been styled 'the Van Gogh of lyrics' by Billboard, the music business trade magazine, and been described by the New York Times as a writer whose songs feel 'almost torn from the flesh'. He is a songwriter's songwriter, whose best writing has been simply, lovingly southern. In the 1970s, when Van Zandt was writing and recording all the time, being southern and making it as a country songwriter meant hoeing pure corn. Which he steadfastly refused to do. Among so much artifice, the genuine, moving measures of Van Zandt's lyrical turns were breathtaking acts of defiance.

Townes' best songs are elusive. Even in those that are positive and seemingly simple there's a shadow around each corner suggesting a shape but not exposing the substance.

When Emmylou Harris recorded his "Pancho And Lefty" for the "Luxury Liner" album, reviewers spent as many words on that one song as they did on the rest of the album. Until then Townes' songs were considered too good for the commercial market. Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Hoyt Axton, Steve Earle, Delbert McClinton, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Bobby Bare, David Olney, Lyle Lovett, Calvin Russell, Don Williams, Cowboy Junkies followed.


Reviews


to write a review