Bill Horist | Soylent Radio

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Electronic: Experimental Avant Garde: Musique Concrète Moods: Instrumental
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Soylent Radio

by Bill Horist

avant-improv experimental prepared guitar soundscapes
Genre: Electronic: Experimental
Release Date: 

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1. Soylent Radio
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11:57 album only
2. The Teeth of our Skin - Part 1 (w/ T. Swanson)
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8:05 album only
3. Clowder (w/ E. Muller-Graf)
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8:37 album only
4. The Teeth of our Skin - Part 2 (w/ T. Swanson)
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11:48 album only
5. 3 Cloven Staircase
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11:23 album only
6. Epilepticify (w/ E. Muller-Graf)
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8:27 album only
7. Penumbra Hotel (w/ R. Hinklin)
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13:37 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
It's always a pleasure to hear guitarists testing their instruments' limits (and those of their effects pedals). Bill Horist, who plays in many other combos and writes scores for short films and TV programs, has made one of the most enjoyable experimental-improv albums to reach A.P. Headquarters recently (we receive more of these things than you'd think).

In both solo pieces and duets with Troy Swanson (electronics), Eveline Muller-Graf (sharp metal objects) and Rich Hinklin (Moog Synth), Horist sculpts engrossing soundscapes that are fantastic to trip to. Even if you're not on illicit substances, Soylent Radio will disturb your well-ordered world. On the solo version of the title track, Horist forges sonic abstractions similar to the musique concrète of '60s composer Tod Dockstader by weaving snatched voices from a radio into unclassifiable swathes of heavily treated guitar.

This piece sets the tone for the album's disorienting, unsettling sound. The subaquatic squalls of "The Teeth Of Our Skin-Part 1" (with Swanson) could soundtrack the horrors of sea life (and death). In the Dadaist anticomposition "Clowder" (with Muller-Graf), grotesque bestial noises swirl around a concatenation of metallic percussion. Soylent Radio's masterpiece is "Penumbra Hotel" (with Hinklin), in which Horist creates six-string surrealism through striated, staccato riffs and chaotic, tangled notes. Near the conclusion, a demented cauldron of animalistic growls and a dramatic drone a la Ligeti in 2001: A Space Odyssey lend great poignance to the track. With Soylent Radio, Horist enters the pantheon of guitar anti-heroes. - Dave Segal (Alternative Press - March 1998)


Reviews


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M.

Great Guitar work!
Experimental guitar music at its best!

Bill Horist is great!

Lance Miller

Penumbra Hotel is a precious gem amongst abstract art.
When visiting one of the Smithsonian art museums, in one with mostly abstract visual art, I noticed my own tendency to be moved by select pieces on display.

I am not schooled in the various layers of intention the artists are speaking with, but I definitely had internal strong reactions to certain creations. As I turned into the entrance of one corridor of the museum, one painting struck with an especially high resonance with me. I was not alone, my friend was also awestruck by this painting.

I feel the same with abstract audio. One particularly high point for my tastes is Eno and Fripp's Heavenly Music Corporation, a guitar soundscape created
in the 1970's.

Penumbra Hotel stands out very much like that favorite painting at the Smithsonian, and Heavenly Music Corporation.