Wayne Wallace | Dedication

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Dedication

by Wayne Wallace

Modern jazz with afro-cuban and brazilian stylings. Great soloists and complex arrangements
Genre: Jazz: Latin Jazz
Release Date: 

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1. Blues Image
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7:29 album only
2. Mr.Day
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5:22 album only
3. Dedication
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7:25 album only
4. R.S.V.P.
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7:18 album only
5. Pat's Song
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7:13 album only
6. Some Day
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7:38 album only
7. Spiritual
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2:53 album only
8. Nena
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6:07 album only
9. Yours Truly
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8:47 album only
10. Benin
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9:39 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
DEDICATION

Jazz is not for everyone. It’s not exclusive, or elitist, but unfortunately it only speaks to a small percentage of the mass music market who grasp its improvisational vocabulary and spirituality. As a result, this music and many of its makers survive marginally in American culture.

What keeps jazz alive is dedication, a commitment to the art by musicians whose creative drive preserves a living liturgy that with every passing generation unfolds new enlightening approaches. The mission of the jazz musician is preserving and advancing a precious historical lineage born out of the African American experience that spans over a hundred years.

Sometimes we don’t realize the plight of the musician and the countless hours of practice, lessons and hard work put into being able to speak and preach the language of jazz properly. Many pay dues doing gigs for 4-5 hours to earn a measly $50-$100 that has them living a monk-like existence pursuing musical truth.

“To talk about dedication to jazz”, says Ray Lucas, founder of Spirit Nectar Records, “is to talk about dedication to the music as a powerful force for good, to the highest standards of musicianship and virtuosity, to the blues, soul and gospel, and to the study and assimilation of musical forms and devices from other cultures—especially from the Afro-Latin Diaspora. Jazz musicians are walking ethno-musicologists emanating a vibe of world citizenship transcending local and national boundaries. It’s a sad irony that jazz is so marginalized in the country of its birth.”

That’s why Wayne Wallace is calling the premiere recording on his Patois Record label, Dedication. The album is a collaborative effort with Ray Lucas, who is producer on the date and the first to record the prolific Dr. Wallace as a leader in 2000 on Three in One. The album reflects Wayne’s deep cultural-musical roots and distinct sound deeply influenced especially by Duke Ellington.

“I think I’ve lived this album my whole life”, comments Wallace. “My background includes working with Narada Michael Walden, Con Funk Shun and Whitney Houston. But in 1992 I made a conscience decision not just to do that anymore and to expand to different types of music that would help me grow in different directions. That, of course, took me to Cuba, where I found music that really interested me and stirred me up emotionally.”

As you will discover, the music on this album will stir you up in more ways than one. It is dedicated to the loving memories of two delightful ladies in the Bay Area jazz family—Patricia Lucas (Ray’s wife) and Carmen Theriault (Paul van Wageningen’s wife)—both of whom passed away recently. And it is dedicated to jazz musicians and jazz lovers in celebration of their dedication.

“Wayne and I started talking about doing this album after Pat passed away”, adds Lucas. “I wanted to do an album, not just for my loving memory, but because she was so dedicated to jazz and helping jazz musicians. What was nice about this recording is that a lot of the people on the set knew Pat and played with great passion and inspiration.”

The musicians joke that the album was an excuse for Ray to throw a four-day party at the studio. He invited an intimate musical family to hang, create and play without restriction. As a result you’ll find this music full of spirit, positive vibration and a prayer to A Love Supreme. I bet Pat and Carmen are smiling down from the heavens.




THE DOCTOR

The sound of Wayne Wallace’s trombone started resonating with me when I was a hippie low-rider cruising around the San Francisco Mission District and listening to the Latin rock sounds of Sapo, a band he recorded with in the early 1970s. During my college years I followed the Pete Escovedo Orchestra and there he was once again as musical director.

When I began in radio 25 years ago I aspired to be an audio engineer and did remote recordings for KJAZ, where I worked 12 years. Seeing I was into it, John Santos hired me as sound man for The Machete Ensemble as he was just launching the group. The band played every major festival and hosted historical concerts like La Evolucion De La Musica Afro-Cubana at Davies Symphony Hall in SF. That’s where I became a Wallace devotee.

The writing, the improvisational thinking and the trail of riffs poured out of Wallace, dubbed “The Doctor” by Latin jazz dean Pete Escovedo. At the time he was Cuba-crazy having visited the island and composing and arranging using traditional and contemporary Afro-Cuban elements. I started researching his recording output and found his Bay Funk connection playing with Con Funk Shun and Bad Water Bridge.

He also played in musical theatre with a prominent gig thanks to Alan Smith at the now-defunct Circle Star Theater, renown for its revolving stage. There he backed up legends like Sammy Davis Jr., Pearl Bailey, Diane Carroll, and The Nicholas Bros. Along with Smith and Fred Berry, he was one of the first African American musicians to ever play in the orchestra.

Born on May 29, 1952, Wayne Wallace is a native San Franciscan. He grew up in the Fillmore District, first on Steiner St., and then on Bush St. His earliest musical memories around the neighborhood include going to jam sessions at The Both/And circa 1970-71.

Wayne recalls those memories: “The Both/And night club was special because Bobby Hutcherson taught theory classes and led jam sessions there. James Leary was playing bass with Bobby’s band. I would give him a lift to the gig so that I could stay. When Bobby was playing I was there all five nights just listening. Those were some of the best lessons of my life.”

As a trombonist he has a clear buttery tone when needed or a belting gust of notes but all served with a complete knowledge of his instrument and its jazz history. He accounts Ellington as his deepest influence but acknowledges McCoy Tyner as having inspired him too. He has played in Tyner’s orchestral, big-band and large ensemble presentations around the Bay Area. “The power and intensity in his playing grabbed me as a kid. I had never heard anybody play with such unique style.”

Highlights abound in Wayne’s career: musical director for the Pete Escovedo Orchestra; live recordings with Manny Oquendo & Libre; collaborative efforts with the Asian American Jazz Orchestra; and his over 20 year stint with John Santos and The Machete Ensemble as co-musical director. These are of course just a few of his many milestones with many other bright moments to attest to his greatness.

“Dedication” is certainly a highlight as he ventures into the record business with confidence and optimism. But it’s the music and musicians who helped make this a super tribute album. “I’m impressed with the maturity of all the musicians playing, and pleased with my writing, the recording and the overall concept.”




THE MUSIC

Dedication is Wayne’s third recording date as a leader, following Three In One and Echoes In Blue. This album has everything we have come to expect from Wayne: a fresh stream of musically highly imaginative compositions, complex and stimulating arrangements which facilitate close communication among the musicians, incredibly tight ensemble playing, and strong intelligent solos.

1

Blues Image Jazz (Wayne Wallace)

Wayne: “Blues Image” was a song I originally composed for an NEA funded suite I wrote called “Digging Up The Roots.” Because of the instrumentation, spirit of the music and the players on the date, I felt this was a perfect tune to kick off the project. I updated the arrangement and added a little extra picante to the horns for good measure. Enjoy!

2

Mr. Day Latin (John Coltrane)

Wayne: “Mr. Day was Ray’s suggestion to record. It’s blues in Gb. That in itself is pretty damn weird. It was (Billy) Strayhorn who insisted on doing songs in unusual keys because he felt the keys sounded different for certain melodies. Gb is a warm key but a bit awkward at times. Hearing the original bass line, it was so in clave I wanted to do it in Latin. You also have to have a tune where everybody solos.

Ray: This was one of Pat’s favorites. It’s on the album Coltrane Plays The Blues, a beautiful but neglected album. It’s the only Gb blues I know and I was aesthetically curious as to what Wayne would do with it. When I showed him the lead sheet and sang the bass line, he immediately said “I’m hearing it as Latin”. Wayne’s version is a happy piece in the exploration of the Latin side of John Coltrane which is being carried on by people like Conrad Herwig.

3

Dedication Latin (Wayne Wallace)

Wayne: “I wanted to write something that was multi-layered for this piece that had different moods with ups and downs. The inspiration was Ray’s original concept of “Dedication”. Like life, music should have a multitude of colors so that the full spectrum is revealed to all.

4

R.S.V.P. Jazz (Wayne Wallace)

I wanted to write a modal sounding piece but I wanted the tune to have a nice little bounce to it. So I came up with this bass line. The piece is like sending an invitation out to people and hope that they respond.

5

Pat’s Song Jazz Waltz (Andrea Brachfeld)

Ray: We carried flutist Andrea Brachfeld’s Remembered Dreams on Spirit Nectar and Pat and I became good friends with her. After Pat passed away and I decided to do this CD I wanted Andrea to be on it. So I called her to see if she wanted to be a part of it. “You didn’t even have to ask. I’m on the plane”, she said. She also said she would write a piece for Pat. The result was “Pat’s Song” which was then arranged by Wayne. To me it is a lovely cooking reminder of Pat and her uncontainable energy, always devoted to the right, the good, the beautiful.

6

Some Day Ballad (McCoy Tyner)

Wayne: This was another request from Ray and a transcription from McCoy’s album Song Of The New World. He had French horns and tuba parts which I rearranged to work with the two trombones.

Ray: This beautiful ballad was Pat’s favorite MyCoy song. The original version featured the great flutist Hubert Laws, who is a great admirer of Andrea’s artistry. So I thought this would be a nice vehicle for Andrea’s flute and for Frank Martin whose unique style is infused with the spirit of McCoy.

7

Spiritual Tone Poem (John Coltrane)

Wayne: Masaru Koga is with the Asian American Jazz Orchestra and someone I wanted to include on this album. Masaru and Hafez Modirzadeh are both steeped in the Coltrane tradition. Having them on board I wanted to use the traditional wooden flutes (Hafez on the Persian ney and Masaru on the Japanese shakuhachi) with just piano and the bass clarinet,
a bit of Eric Dolphy. We did it more as a tone poem rather than an improvised piece.

Ray: I’ve been playing “Spiritual” for years. It’s representative of what Trane was all about, not just as a musician but as a philosopher. I was so gassed by the way Wayne did it. His arrangement with the wooden flutes brings out a different spiritual dimension to “Spiritual”. I think Trane would have loved it.

8

Nena Bossa Nova (Wayne Wallace)

Wayne: “Nena” is a ballad I wrote for a friend. I like songs where the melody dictates what happens. There’s a couple of 6/4 bars that we do as a slow bossa nova which has a Herbie Hancock influence from “Speak Like A Child”.

Ray: When I heard “Nena”, it was such a pretty melody
I thought it must be about a woman, it reminded of Pat, and I burst into tears. When I told Wayne I had cried when I heard it, he said “Good. My music is evocative of true emotion.”
I heartily agree.

9

Yours Truly Jazz (Wayne Wallace)

Wayne: I wanted to have a blues on the album that wasn’t a straight up blues. A lot of people who are branded as Latin jazz players can actually play jazz. So I thought it would be nice to have a setting that lets them play outside of the normal context.




10

Benin Afro Jazz (Wayne Wallace)

Wayne: The Yoruba people originate from Southwestern Nigeria. At one time they had a powerful and complex social structure that was organized in a series of kingdoms, the most important of which was that of Benin. Santeria had its birth in Nigeria, along the banks of the Niger river. (Oyá, Goddess of the Niger river is sometimes represented with nine heads, which is the number of tributaries of the Niger river.) We as a group of musicians have drawn much inspiration from this culture. “Benin” is a tribute to the spirit of the African Diaspora in the Americas. —Jesse “Chuy” Varela

Jesse “Chuy” Varela is music director at KCSM FM 91 in


San Mateo, CA and a freelance writer with the SF Chronicle, Eastbay Express, Latin Beat and Jazz Times Magazine.




Produced by Ray Lucas
Studio Producer Wayne Wallace
Sound Engineer Gary Mankin
Recording Assistant James Frazier
Mastering Paul Stubblebine
Photos David Belove
Photo of Ron Stallings Hugh Lovell
Graphics Melissa Roberts
Production Assistants Dave Lucas and Leslie Woodhouse
Special thanks to Andrew Lucas
Recording Session Coordinator Kristina Kilbourne
Recorded
April 2006 at Bay Records Studios,
Berkeley, California

Babatunde Lea appears courtesy of Mokema Music
Andrea Brachfeld plays Armstrong flutes
Wayne Wallace plays King trombones

Dedicated
to the loving memories of
Patricia Lucas and Carmen Theriault










1. Blues Image Soloists—Masura Koga, Wayne Wallace, John Santos, Frank Martin

John Santos—Timbales
Paul Van Wageningen—Trap Drums
David Belove—Bass
Frank Martin—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Flute
Mary Fettig—Soprano Sax
Masaru Koga—Alto Sax
Hafez Modirzadeh—Tenor Sax, Soprano Sax
Louis Fasman—Trumpet
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
2. Mr. Day Soloists—Babatunde Lea, Murray Low, Jeff Cressman, Masaru Koga, John Worley, Hafez Modirzadeh, Wayne Wallace, Andrea Brachfeld, Mary Fettig, John Santos

Babatunde Lea—Congas,
John Santos—Timbales, Guiro
Paul Van Wageningen—Trap Drums
David Belove—Bass
Murray Low—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Flute,Piccolo
Mary Fettig—Soprano
Masaru Koga—Alto Sax
Hafez Modirzadeh—Tenor Sax
John Worley—Trumpet
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
3. Dedication Soloists—Murray Low, Wayne Wallace, Jeff Cressman, John Santos, Paul Van Wageningen

Babatunde Lea—Congas
John Santos—Timbales
Paul Van Wageningen—Trap Drums
David Belove—Bass
Murray Low—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Flute, Alto Flute
Mary Fettig—Soprano Sax, Bass Clarinet
Masaru Koga—Alto Sax, Flute
Hafez Modirzadeh—Tenor Sax, Soprano Sax
John Worley—Trumpet, Flugelhorn
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
4. R.S.V.P. Soloists—Frank Martin, Wayne Wallace, John Worley, Hafez Modirzadeh

Babatunde Lea—Trap drums
David Belove—Bass
Frank Martin—Piano
Hafez Modirzadeh—Tenor Sax
John Worley—Trumpet
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
5. Pat’s Song Soloists—Andrea Brachfeld, Wayne Wallace, Frank Martin, Babatunde Lea

Babatunde Lea—Trap drums
David Belove—Bass
Frank Martin—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Flute
Mary Fettig—Bass Clarinet
Masaru Koga—Alto Sax
Hafez Modirzadeh—Soprano Sax
John Worley—Trumpet, Flugelhorn
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
6. Some Day Soloists—David Belove, Andrea Brachfeld, Wayne Wallace, Frank Martin

Babatunde Lea—Trap drums
David Belove—Bass
Frank Martin—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Flute
Mary Fettig—Soprano
Masaru Koga—Alto Sax
Hafez Modirzadeh—Tenor Sax
John Worley—Trumpet, Flugelhorn
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
7. Spiritual

Murray Low—Piano
Mary Fettig—Bass Clarinet
Masaru Koga—Shakuhachi
Hafez Modirzadeh—Ney
8. Nena Soloists—Mary Fettig, Wayne Wallace, Murray Low

John Santos—Percussion
Paul Van Wageningen—Trap Drums
David Belove—Bass
Murray Low—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Alto Flute
Mary Fettig—Bass Clarinet
John Worley—Flugelhorn
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone


9. Yours Truly Soloists—Wayne Wallace, Louis Fasman, Masura Koga, Jeff Cressman, Mary Fettig, Murray Low

Babatunde Lea—Trap drums
David Belove—Bass
Murray Low—Piano
Mary Fettig—Tenor Sax
Masaru Koga—Alto Sax,
Louis Fasman—Trumpet
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone
10. Benin Soloists—Mary Fettig, Wayne Wallace, Hafez Modirzadeh, Ron Stallings

Babatunde Lea—Congas, and Shekere
John Santos—Congas
Paul Van Wageningen—Trap Drums
David Belove—Bass
Murray Low—Piano
Andrea Brachfeld—Flute
Mary Fettig—Bass Clarinet
Masaru Koga—Soprano Sax,
Hafez Modirzadeh—Tenor Sax
Ron Stallings—Alto Sax
John Worley—Trumpet
Jeff Cressman—Trombone
Wayne Wallace—Trombone


Reviews


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dr. ulysses s. crockett, jr.

THANKS TO ALL THE WALLACE CREW FOR SOPHISTICATED SWINGING ARRANGEMENTS AND OVERA
Dedication; Wayne Wallace et al
1. Glad to see the masterpiece was recorded at our local Bay Records. The facility staff did a wonderful job and it is hoped the name of the Bay Records engineer-owner appears on the CD compilation.
2. The breadth of styles presented is balanced and not just a bunch of four beat descarga mmontuno type songs. In this connection, the bass phrasings of Master David Belove, not only fit appropriately into the selections but illustrate innovative intelligent emotionally moving phrases for which all the listening world has been awaiting. The selection where a little 6/8 count was demonstrated was a refreshing departure from the all too omnipresent 4/4 jazz music being presented today. Fortunately Pat Metheney and Lyle Mayes have ventured into writing and performing music with variant time counts unfrozen by the ubiquitous monotnous four beat.

3. Of course the orchestrations constitute the nadir of the CD presentations for which Doctor Wallace is to be congratulated. Listeners cannot avoid appreciating and being moved by the timbre and sonorities of the wooden flutes.

4. All the musician performances are above average in technique, musicianship and musical ideas, which as we also know is what the music language is all about. Us Bay Areans were taught this sensitivity by late pianist Jim Young (Joachim), Master Babatunde Lea's close colleague for many years.

5. Fiinally, the CD Baby notes are not only informative but educate the reader of the major sacrifice all artists make economically in order to pursue their art; yet, as the notes point out, performing musicians face extra challenges given instrument purchases, travel expenses, recording expenses, publishing expenses - all incurred while trying to maintain minimal living expenses. Alas, the facist plutocrat economic system of this Bilderberg group controlled United States, leaves few artistic independent options. In the recent past, Master John Santos set forth similar written sentiments in an electronic note to Dory Stein's Tangents Radio at KALW.
Yet we soldier on and Dedication is basically a tribute to artists worldwide who choose to maintainn a commitment to sharing individual efforts unencumbered by the dictates of financiers with limmited understanding of the artistic endeavor.

See: prisonplanet.com
infowars.com
freedomtofacism.com
Web logs of Ulysses Crocket; blogigo.com
blogstream.com

Google or Ask Jeeves ulysses crpckett for examples of Crockett's efforts in egalitarianism.

Again.. congratulations to all involved the Dedication effort.
Quod Erad Demonstradum. USC