Pablo Ziegler & Quique Sinesi | Buenos Aires Report

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Jazz: Latin Jazz Latin: Tango Moods: Featuring Piano
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Buenos Aires Report

by Pablo Ziegler & Quique Sinesi

Highly virtuosic Argentinian tango jazz in instrumental trio and duo settings, featuring Pablo Ziegler - long time music director for the legendary Astor Piazzolla.
Genre: Jazz: Latin Jazz
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Buenos Aires Report
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5:04 $0.99
2. Pajaro Angel
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5:26 $0.99
3. Places
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6:52 $0.99
4. Milonga para Hermeto
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5:01 $0.99
5. Blues Porteno
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7:33 $0.99
6. Elegante Canyebguito
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7:09 $0.99
7. Muchacho de Boedo
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9:33 $0.99
8. Buenos Aires Dark
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7:23 $0.99
9. Libertango
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11:34 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
• BUENOS AIRES REPORT, by the internationally acclaimed Argentinian tango / jazz pianist, composer and band leader Pablo Ziegler, is his second ZOHO CD recording since his highly acclaimed SONY Classical and BMG releases of the 1990’s. It features highly virtuosic tango trio and duo settings featuring Argentinian guitarist Quique Sinesi, and special guest Walter Castro on bandoneon.

• BAJO CERO – Ziegler’s critically acclaimed first ZOHO CD release with the same trio, won a Latin Grammy award in the tango category in November 2005!

• Ziegler is the most important artist of the Tango Nuevo, and the legitimate successor of the great Astor Piazzolla whose most famous composition Libertango is included on this release.

• Between 1978 and 1989, Ziegler worked continuously with Astor Piazzolla and contributed substantially to his enormous success.

• A classically trained pianist and a veteran of the vibrant Buenos Aires jazz scene, Ziegler has taken Tango, South America’s most sultry and passionate music, into a new direction by using improvisational elements, and further exploring the common ground between Tango and jazz.


Reviews


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John Book, Music For America

Visionary jazz, as it should be
Jazz. Tango. One might see those two words and assume that it would result in sounds of chaos, but far from it. Pablo Ziegler has been a part of the Amsterdam jazz scene for decades, and his knack to bring together sounds from the Latin world was not by accident, but more through appreciation. Musicians who heard him became influenced through his work, and began to shine through their interpretations of similar unions. Nonetheless, Ziegler has gained a reputation for very moving musicianship and compositions, which can be heard in Buenos Aires Report (Zoho.)

Ziegler teams up once again with Quique Sinesi (guitar) and Walter Castro (bandoneon) for music that is both bold, daring, and exhilirating. Ziegler's piano work could easily be compared to Keith Jarrett, Herbie Hancock, or Bill Evans, but with a European asthetic he brings something unique into play. His playing comes off like a construction in the works, where the picture isn't fully seen or even visioned until each song comes to its conclusion. The way Ziegler and Sinesi work together is just great,with Sinesi's guitar work often times taking on a life of its own, complimenting what Ziegler is doing with the piano. Sinesi's own work, "Milonga Para Hermeto", sounds like either acoustic fusion or the work of an exotic dance only meant for two, it's very intense, especially as Castro starts to play passionately on the bandoneon (part of the accordion family).

There is a lot of room for improvisation and creating new ways of expression, whether it's "Buenos Aires Dark" performed in 9/4 or the slow crawl of "Muchacha de Boedo". The sounds created together can be enchanting, romantic, and very much thought provoking, the kindof music where you want to go into a listening room and cut off the rest of the world for an hour. You might get a few unknown visions after making it through this, only to move up and start it all over again.