Zoe Rahman | Kindred Spirits

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Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz Jazz: Piano Jazz Moods: Featuring Piano
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Kindred Spirits

by Zoe Rahman

A powerful and fresh portrait of Zoe's combined English, Irish and Bengali heritage, this album "could well be seen in the future as one of the best British jazz albums of this period" (Jazzwise)
Genre: Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz
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Tracks

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1. Down to Earth
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6:24 album only
2. Conversation with Nellie
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5:31 album only
3. Maya
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6:24 album only
4. Forbiddance (Mana Na Manili) /My Heart Dances, like a Peacock, it Dances (Hridoy Amar Nache Re)
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8:24 album only
5. Butlers of Glen Avenue
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2:25 album only
6. Outside In
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5:02 album only
7. Imagination (Hridoy Amar Prokash Holo)
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3:06 album only
8. Rise Above
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4:33 album only
9. Fly in the Ointment
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5:26 album only
10. Contusion
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3:50 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
JAZZWISE MAGAZINE: ZOE RAHMAN’S “KINDRED SPIRITS” 4-STAR ALBUM REVIEW by Stuart Nicholson

Zoe Rahman (piano), Idris Rahman (clarinet; bass-clarinet), Courtney Pine (alto flute), Oli Hayhurst (double bass), and Gene Calderazzo (drums). Rec. 2011

Quite one of the best albums of the last couple of years. Washed with the Zeitgeist of transculturation, or glocalisation (the localism of a global art form), that is gathering momentum in jazz....whereby artists incorporate elements of their own culture to express identity within the music, the result is the convincing artistic statement on record that you knew would come sooner, rather than later, from this most absorbing of pianists....

She still loves the intensity and lessons learned from that hugely underrated pianist Joanne Brackeen (‘Down to Earth’), but with maturity seems to come a need to seek a deeper meaning in her work, such as the medley of Rabindranath Tagore pieces. Especially interesting is the synergy of musical oneness that is apparent in the four tracks with her brother Idris on clarinet. His unimpeachable – almost classical – tone and centred ideas seem somehow better realised than on 2007’s Live or their album length collaboration Where Rivers Meet. Offering the welcome contrast of tonal variety, he makes an essential contribution to what could well be seen in the future as one of the best British jazz albums of this period.


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